POLICY

Indonesia-Norway partnership marks a decade of success
May 26, 2020

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Today (May 26) marks the 10-year signing of the Letter of Intent (LoI) between Indonesia and Norway for a climate change partnership aimed at significantly contributing to reductions in emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. 

According to the Director General of Climate Change at the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry Ruandha Agung Sugardiman, who also serves as the National Focal Point (NFP) of the UNFCCC and is central to the LoI between Indonesia and Norway, the climate partnership has been successfully implemented over the past decade.

In the 10 years since the signing of the LoI, the director general explained, the partnership is deemed to have significantly contributed to Indonesia's preparedness to undertake forestry results-based payments for REDD + with the presence of readiness instruments, including the second Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL) 2020 and the National Forest Monitoring System (NFMS). 

In addition to these readiness instruments, he continued, other tools such as the Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) system, Safeguard Information System (SIS), National Registry System (NRS), and Environmental Fund Management Agency (BPDLH) are in place.

“All these instruments are stipulated in the Environment and Forestry Minister’s regulation, which was issued at the end of December 2017," he said. 

“This ministerial regulation specifically covers the arrangement and procedures for carrying out the reduction of emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, the role of conservation, and the sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks,” the director general elaborated

“A number of key indicators of success are clearly quantifiable and have been internationally verified. The execution of the results-based payment (RBP) will reflect this success,” Sugardiman enthused.

“The execution of the results-based payment will confirm that Indonesia has managed to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation” he added. 

As previously reported by foresthints.news (May 20), Indonesian Environment and Forestry Siti Nurbaya said that the first results-based payment from Norway amounts to USD56 million and is expected to be paid in June this year.

In early May 2015, President Joko Widodo consolidated all working units on climate change and carbon issues into a single authority under the control of the Environment and Forestry Ministry, by forming the Directorate General of Climate Change. Legally, the Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister is the country climate authority.

The following graphs depict the extent of the Indonesian moratorium map on primary forests and peatlands over the last 10 years. The moratorium continues to cover an area greater than 66 million hectares, bigger than France.

From early August 2019, President Joko Widodo imposed it as a permanent moratorium until improved forestry and peat governance is achieved.

Transformation continuing 

Director General Sugardiman emphasized that the decision to amend the LoI had been taken by the two countries in the spirit of continuing to strengthen the partnership, by reinforcing the grounds for mutual trust and respect between them. 

“In the latest version of the proposed amended LoI, it was agreed to develop a joint implementation mechanism as one of the general approaches and principles to strengthen the partnership, among other new measures,” he pointed out. 

“The key purpose is to become increasingly engaged, increasingly inclusive and to increasingly strengthen the level of the climate change partnership,” Sugardiman added. 

The director general explained that Minister Nurbaya continues to push for the successful implementation of the partnership, especially in the 2020-2030 period, which will be marked by the continuing transfer of results-based payments to Indonesia’s Environment Fund. 

“However, this can only be achieved with Indonesia's consistent commitment to contributing significantly to reductions in emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, and peatlands and mangrove conversion,” he asserted.

“The level of efforts aimed at these two targets has to take place simultaneously,” he added.

With regard to the 10 years of implementation of the Indonesia-Norway climate change partnership, he delivered a key message from Minister Nurbaya that the continuation of transformation should remain focused on accelerating the implementation of internationally verified results-based payments.

He went on to stress that “the continuation of transformation is believed to be achievable backed by a joint implementation mechanism which refers to the newly-amended LoI to be signed in the very near future.”


TAGS: LOI , NORWAY , CLIMATE CHANGE

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Indonesia-Norway partnership marks a decade of success
May 26, 2020

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Today (May 26) marks the 10-year signing of the Letter of Intent (LoI) between Indonesia and Norway for a climate change partnership aimed at significantly contributing to reductions in emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. 

According to the Director General of Climate Change at the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry Ruandha Agung Sugardiman, who also serves as the National Focal Point (NFP) of the UNFCCC and is central to the LoI between Indonesia and Norway, the climate partnership has been successfully implemented over the past decade.

In the 10 years since the signing of the LoI, the director general explained, the partnership is deemed to have significantly contributed to Indonesia's preparedness to undertake forestry results-based payments for REDD + with the presence of readiness instruments, including the second Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL) 2020 and the National Forest Monitoring System (NFMS). 

In addition to these readiness instruments, he continued, other tools such as the Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) system, Safeguard Information System (SIS), National Registry System (NRS), and Environmental Fund Management Agency (BPDLH) are in place.

“All these instruments are stipulated in the Environment and Forestry Minister’s regulation, which was issued at the end of December 2017," he said. 

“This ministerial regulation specifically covers the arrangement and procedures for carrying out the reduction of emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, the role of conservation, and the sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks,” the director general elaborated

“A number of key indicators of success are clearly quantifiable and have been internationally verified. The execution of the results-based payment (RBP) will reflect this success,” Sugardiman enthused.

“The execution of the results-based payment will confirm that Indonesia has managed to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation” he added. 

As previously reported by foresthints.news (May 20), Indonesian Environment and Forestry Siti Nurbaya said that the first results-based payment from Norway amounts to USD56 million and is expected to be paid in June this year.

In early May 2015, President Joko Widodo consolidated all working units on climate change and carbon issues into a single authority under the control of the Environment and Forestry Ministry, by forming the Directorate General of Climate Change. Legally, the Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister is the country climate authority.

The following graphs depict the extent of the Indonesian moratorium map on primary forests and peatlands over the last 10 years. The moratorium continues to cover an area greater than 66 million hectares, bigger than France.

From early August 2019, President Joko Widodo imposed it as a permanent moratorium until improved forestry and peat governance is achieved.

Transformation continuing 

Director General Sugardiman emphasized that the decision to amend the LoI had been taken by the two countries in the spirit of continuing to strengthen the partnership, by reinforcing the grounds for mutual trust and respect between them. 

“In the latest version of the proposed amended LoI, it was agreed to develop a joint implementation mechanism as one of the general approaches and principles to strengthen the partnership, among other new measures,” he pointed out. 

“The key purpose is to become increasingly engaged, increasingly inclusive and to increasingly strengthen the level of the climate change partnership,” Sugardiman added. 

The director general explained that Minister Nurbaya continues to push for the successful implementation of the partnership, especially in the 2020-2030 period, which will be marked by the continuing transfer of results-based payments to Indonesia’s Environment Fund. 

“However, this can only be achieved with Indonesia's consistent commitment to contributing significantly to reductions in emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, and peatlands and mangrove conversion,” he asserted.

“The level of efforts aimed at these two targets has to take place simultaneously,” he added.

With regard to the 10 years of implementation of the Indonesia-Norway climate change partnership, he delivered a key message from Minister Nurbaya that the continuation of transformation should remain focused on accelerating the implementation of internationally verified results-based payments.

He went on to stress that “the continuation of transformation is believed to be achievable backed by a joint implementation mechanism which refers to the newly-amended LoI to be signed in the very near future.”


TAGS: LOI , NORWAY , CLIMATE CHANGE

RELATED STORIES