POLICY

Indonesia delivers positive news on levels of forest loss
June 3, 2020

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JAKARTA (foresthints.news) - Data from the University of Maryland released by Global Forest Watch (Jun 2) shows, among other things, a decline in forest loss in Indonesia in 2019.

The World Resources Institute (WRI) wrote on its blog "In positive news, primary forest loss in Indonesia decreased by 5% in 2019 compared to the year before, marking the third year in a row of lower levels of loss.”

The primary forests referred to by WRI consist of 30% minimum tree cover density. Technically and legally, the definition of primary forests is substantially different from the definition used by the Indonesian government which defines primary forests as undisturbed forests that have never been exploited or disturbed by humans.

Under this definition, the Indonesian forestry authorities have revealed that from 2017/2018 to 2018/2019 less than 100 thousand hectares of primary forest were lost. The figure is far below the primary forest loss level of the Global Forest Watch version, due to a significant difference in the definition of primary forests.

Historically low forest loss numbers

WRI, in its analysis, also wrote that "three consecutive years of historically low loss numbers suggest that Indonesia might have turned a corner in its efforts to reduce deforestation."

The following graph from WRI demonstrates the three-year moving average (black line) in the loss of primary forest (which is defined as forest with at least 30% tree cover density) from 2002-2019. The decline in forest loss from 2017-2019, hailed as positive news by WRI, is clear.

WRI explained that another factor which has likely contributed to the reduction of forest loss levels, in addition to increased law enforcement, is the presence of the now-permanent moratorium on primary forests and peatlands.

As previously reported by foresthints.news (May 26), the two graphs below show the extent of areas covered by the permanent moratorium standing consistently at above 66 million hectares, more than double the size of ​​the UK.

With regard to primary forests in Papua and West Papua, WRI wrote that these provinces "also continued to experience low levels of loss in 2019." 

WRI noted that "Loss within protected forests and protected areas in Indonesia was still very low, but ticked up slightly from 2018, primarily due to natural causes such as storm damage."

Deforestation trends

According to data on deforestation trends from 2011/2012 to 2018/2019 sourced from Indonesia’s Ministry of the Environment and Forestry, as also reported by foresthints.news (May 28), there has been a steady decline in deforestation under President Widodo’s administration.

Appreciation for the reduction of deforestation in Indonesia over the past three years was also conveyed in a recent joint statement from Indonesia and Norway to mark a decade of the climate change partnership between the two countries, as previously reported by foresthints.news (May 28).

The joint statement included praise for the achievements of the Widodo administration, stating "deforestation and forest and peat degradation have declined for three years in a row.”

According to the joint statement, the priorities set by Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya, as well as the efforts she continues to undertake, mean that "the Indonesian government can now demonstrate substantial emission reductions for three consecutive years." 

This is mirrored by WRI in the Indonesian section of its blog where it wrote that “Indonesia has maintained lower losses for a third year in a row.”


TAGS: FOREST LOSS , TREE COVER , DEFORESTATION

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Indonesia delivers positive news on levels of forest loss
June 3, 2020

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (foresthints.news) - Data from the University of Maryland released by Global Forest Watch (Jun 2) shows, among other things, a decline in forest loss in Indonesia in 2019.

The World Resources Institute (WRI) wrote on its blog "In positive news, primary forest loss in Indonesia decreased by 5% in 2019 compared to the year before, marking the third year in a row of lower levels of loss.”

The primary forests referred to by WRI consist of 30% minimum tree cover density. Technically and legally, the definition of primary forests is substantially different from the definition used by the Indonesian government which defines primary forests as undisturbed forests that have never been exploited or disturbed by humans.

Under this definition, the Indonesian forestry authorities have revealed that from 2017/2018 to 2018/2019 less than 100 thousand hectares of primary forest were lost. The figure is far below the primary forest loss level of the Global Forest Watch version, due to a significant difference in the definition of primary forests.

Historically low forest loss numbers

WRI, in its analysis, also wrote that "three consecutive years of historically low loss numbers suggest that Indonesia might have turned a corner in its efforts to reduce deforestation."

The following graph from WRI demonstrates the three-year moving average (black line) in the loss of primary forest (which is defined as forest with at least 30% tree cover density) from 2002-2019. The decline in forest loss from 2017-2019, hailed as positive news by WRI, is clear.

WRI explained that another factor which has likely contributed to the reduction of forest loss levels, in addition to increased law enforcement, is the presence of the now-permanent moratorium on primary forests and peatlands.

As previously reported by foresthints.news (May 26), the two graphs below show the extent of areas covered by the permanent moratorium standing consistently at above 66 million hectares, more than double the size of ​​the UK.

With regard to primary forests in Papua and West Papua, WRI wrote that these provinces "also continued to experience low levels of loss in 2019." 

WRI noted that "Loss within protected forests and protected areas in Indonesia was still very low, but ticked up slightly from 2018, primarily due to natural causes such as storm damage."

Deforestation trends

According to data on deforestation trends from 2011/2012 to 2018/2019 sourced from Indonesia’s Ministry of the Environment and Forestry, as also reported by foresthints.news (May 28), there has been a steady decline in deforestation under President Widodo’s administration.

Appreciation for the reduction of deforestation in Indonesia over the past three years was also conveyed in a recent joint statement from Indonesia and Norway to mark a decade of the climate change partnership between the two countries, as previously reported by foresthints.news (May 28).

The joint statement included praise for the achievements of the Widodo administration, stating "deforestation and forest and peat degradation have declined for three years in a row.”

According to the joint statement, the priorities set by Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya, as well as the efforts she continues to undertake, mean that "the Indonesian government can now demonstrate substantial emission reductions for three consecutive years." 

This is mirrored by WRI in the Indonesian section of its blog where it wrote that “Indonesia has maintained lower losses for a third year in a row.”


TAGS: FOREST LOSS , TREE COVER , DEFORESTATION

RELATED STORIES